Chasing the Avocado

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Happiness is a ripe avocado. If you have ever lived in California, you know this to be true.

My daughter, six months young, is learning all about this magical fruit’s elusivity, as she cannot yet grasp avocado between her lusting fingers. Perhaps it is because she is mine or because her blue eyes penetrate my soul, but I find few things more mesmerizing than watching my daughter’s hands seek the promise of satiety.

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A Holiday Fast

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This year for Thanksgiving, I felt compelled to undertake a 3-day social media cleanse. It was an experiment of sorts to understand how the impacts of Facebook, news media, and even this blog shape my relationships and overall emotional state. Earlier this fall, I confronted my own addiction and was hopeful that a Thanksgiving fast would prepare my heart for the holiday season. In truth, I originally sought for my information purge to last an entire week, but I am a scholar rooted in reality – I actually wanted to meet my goal.

What changed?

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The Other Side

Shoes

My son has recently become obsessed with shoes. Not his shoes, of course, but Mom and Dad’s. We encourage him to explore (even when this leads to us tripping over said shoes), but we always remind him of the danger of trying to wear shoes that are too big: he might fall.

Isn’t this a beautiful metaphor for life? We spend so much of our time trying to rush our lives away to get to the good parts – where the shoe fits and where we think we will no longer fall.

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When a Train Rings the Bell

Halloween 2015

Our neighborhood is no longer sexy. In fact, it reached its peak decades ago. We, of course, understood this when we purchased our home back in 2013, but we thought our young family could infuse life into it once again. Now that we are seasoned homeowners, we understand how naïve we were in believing that moving into an older neighborhood would change anything.

Young families, at least in the rural South, rarely live in cities (no matter how big or small), and sprawl continues. I think we are more acutely aware of this phenomenon because (1) environmental stewardship is important to us and (2) we chose to be countercultural in our home purchase (i.e. we live in the city).

Doing what you feel is best, however, rarely comes without sacrifice.

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Scary Things

Halloween

Have you ever been to a box store on “Sample Day”? At every aisle there seems to be a delicious clear plastic cup available for the mere cost of 50-500+ calories. If you play your cards right, you can eat close to a full meal – or at least enough to calm the hunger monsters for the remainder of your shopping experience.

Personally, I hate shopping, even for food, but there is something enticing about being served – about others giving you a slice of undeserved goodness. Further, it is a treat when that which is offered is something that you wouldn’t normally allow yourself to purchase. In our hearts, however, I think we all have come to learn that nothing in life is truly free, whether or not the cost is known to us.

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Take Off Your Mask and Follow Me*

Statesboro

I live in a small Southern community and every day is a masquerade. When my husband and I moved here a little over two years ago, we were greeted with some very personal questions: “When do you think you’ll leave?” and “Wait, you bought a house?” Additionally, we received some unsettling advice: “You will never fit in here” and “Don’t raise your children here”.

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Washing Away Stains of Discontent

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One year after my husband and I moved into our first home, we purchased our first new appliances: a washer and dryer. This upgrade was more energy efficient, which would benefit our pockets as well as the environment. I should have been content, but I wasn’t.

In this country, we are encouraged to pursue our career ambitions, raise a family/leave a legacy, and buy things…lots of things. It almost felt like a rite of passage to buy new appliances and project a confident air of financial stability. We had earned it, after all.

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