Every goodnight kiss is a gift.

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When you’re a new mother, it feels like they’ll be little forever.
You study their every part. You learn their every mood. You breathe more deeply in their presence.

But then life changes, and you settle into routines. And you begin to understand the difficulty that comes with children growing – evolving into better humans.

And, at some point, you may return to work.

Continue reading “Every goodnight kiss is a gift.”

What I Wish I’d Known

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It’s an overused motif, really. But every mother has some secret locked away – a confession waiting to be read.

And, after two years of blogging, I suppose it’s my turn.

Of all my life’s choices, I wish I had mastered something so simple – so vital to parenthood.

Before children, I never learned to savor the moment right in front of me.

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Why Mothers Hold On

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Our family recently moved…twice. And somewhere in between the boxes and whispered curse words, I caught a glimpse of nearly three years of loving sacrifice.

Nursing bras.

My husband had carefully stacked my drawers beside the dresser, and in that moment I felt exposed.

What am I still holding on?

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Letting in the Sunshine: 13 Questions

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My husband and I never do things the traditional way. Take, for example, our 2010 World Cup-inspired mission trip to South Africa. I mean, what better way to celebrate your first year of marriage than with vuvuzelas and chicken feet, right?

When I reflect on this adventure, I think back to the dozens of questions that the village children asked me each morning.

“I hear there is a bin for paper, plastic, and tin. Is this true?”

“How old are you?”

And perhaps my favorite of all: “Are you married to the scientist?”

The wonder in their eyes was almost tangible. And, in full transparency, their attention made me feel like a million dollars. I want to see the world this way.

But, alas, I was forced to return to my old life, my old habits, my old attitudes. And only in my matured adult years have I come to see that that perfect African sunset was never meant to be left behind – it was designed to become a part of me.

Continue reading “Letting in the Sunshine: 13 Questions”